Sex Offender Registration

The Michigan Public Sex Offender Registry (PSOR) is a registry open to the general public that can be accessed via the Internet. It includes information concerning individuals who have been convicted of crimes of a sexual nature. The registry, as its name implies, is a public information website that can be accessed by anyone, including private individuals, law enforcement officials, school officials, and prospective and current employers who want to locate sex offenders in their neighborhoods.

Registration on the Michigan Public Sex Offender Registry Can Be a "Scarlet Letter" on Your Life

It is imperative that a person charged with a sex crime explore every option to avoid being forced to register on the PSOR because it can affect the everyday lives of the individuals forced to register by the loss of job opportunities, the disqualification for obtaining student loans, the disqualification for government programs, the loss of freedom to live or visit where you choose, and the loss of freedom to attend certain schools.

Individuals Convicted of or Placed on Probation for Sex Offenses are Required to Register as a Sex Offender

In Michigan, and every other state in the U.S., a person convicted of a crime of a sexual nature or certain sex related offenses is forced to register as a sex offender. The Michigan Sex Offender Registry Act (SORA) requires individuals to have their identities, current addresses, and other identifying information published on the Michigan Public Sex Offender Registry (PSOR).

In order to comply with federal demands, on April 12, 2011, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder signed legislation passing new laws that impact all sex offenders. As of July 1, 2011, under new law, sex offenders must now provide even more information about their identity including social security number, passport information, vehicle information, employer information, and even their e-mail addresses.

The registration requirements also apply to non-resident individuals, such as students and visitors, who are required to register in their home states. Failure to register when ordered could result in additional criminal charges and incarceration including prison.

The specific nature of the offense determines whether the individual has to register for life, or for  period of 25 years. In addition to the initial registration requirements under the Act, individuals must also update their residency information, in person, with a local law enforcement agency within their communities at certain, specific intervals every year.

Three Tiers of Sex Offenders

Currently, Michigan law divides registration of adult sex offenders into three tiers:

  • First-Tier Offenders: Sex offenders convicted under the first-tier, which can include those convicted of indecent exposure or a lesser sex crime, are no longer required to be listed on the public sex offender registry.
  • Second-Tier Offenders: Sex offenders who are classified under the second-tier can include individuals convicted of date rape and child pornography. The names of individuals convicted of second-tier offenses will appear publicly on the sex offender registry for 25 years.
  • Third-Tier Offenders: Convicted sex offenders considered the most predatory will fall under the third-tier and their names will appear on the public sex offender registry for life.

The Michigan Public Sex Offender Registry reporting requirements are too complex for most individuals to fully understand and severely punish individuals who don't fully meet all the Act's harsh requirements. If you are unclear about what specific reporting requirements are necessary to comply with the Act, an experienced sex crimes attorney at Grabel & Associates can help you.

Romeo & Juliet Sex Offenders

Under old Michigan sex offense law, even minors convicted of having sexual relations with other minors appeared on the public sex offender registry. Under the new law, previously convicted “Romeo & Juliet” sex offenders may be able to petition to have their names removed from the public registry.

As of July 1, 2011, Romeo & Juliet laws adopted in Michigan may exempt minors and other individuals convicted of statutory rape from public sex offender registration if the alleged victim was between the ages of 13 and 16, and:

  • The sex act was consensual; and
  • There was no more than four years of age difference between the partners when the act occurred.
Our Firm is Committed to Keeping Your Name off the Michigan Sex Offender Registry

The attorneys at Grabel & Associates understand how important it is to keep a client's name off of the sex offender registry. When it comes to sex offenses that carry the social stigma of registration, there can be no shortcuts with your legal representation. Our law firm has a proven track record of keeping our client's names off the sex offender list. With ramifications this life changing our aggressive defense team never forgets what's at stake for our clients and their family.

Our criminal defense law firm has a proud history of successfully protecting the rights and futures of people charged with sex registry offenses, such as:

If you, or someone you know, has been charged with a sex offense that requires registration anywhere in the state of Michigan and has questions about how your name can be kept off the sex offender registry contact a lawyer at Grabel & Associates for a free, confidential consultation to explain how we can help.

The attorneys at Grabel & Associates defend clients in all 83 counties in Michigan.

Michigan Sex Crime Attorneys Blog - Sex Offenders Registry